A Visual History of NASA's Project Constellation
STOP! Project Constellation was officially cancelled in October 2010. So what comes next? Click here to find out!
Welcome to the unofficial Project Constellation image archive. Constellation is NASA's program to replace the space shuttle with a capsule based system similar to Apollo. This is my image collection of that project.

Project Constellation was cancelled on Monday, February 1, 2010 by President Obama. Read NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden's statement for details.
  • This page is dedicated to concept images.
  • The hardware page (new launch photos!!) is dedicated to photos of actual flight hardware.
Updated: January 29, 2011

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Contents
• Links      • Hardware Pics New!
• Project Constellation
     • Discarded System Concepts
     • Approved System Concept
• Crew Exploration Vehicle (Orion)
     • Discarded CEV Concepts
     • Approved CEV Concept
     • Lockheed Designs the CEV
     • Launch Abort System Test
     • 2nd Stage & LAS Test
• The Ares Rocket Family
     • The Ares I Integrated Vehicle
     • The Ares I-X Rocket
     • The Ares V Rocket
     • Ares V Large Space Telescope
• Rocket Engines
     • J-2X
     • RS-68
• The Earth Departure Stage
• The Altair Moon Lander
     • 2006 NASA Proposal
     • 2007 Lockheed Martin Proposal
     • NASA names it Altair; December, 2007
• Near Earth Asteroid Mission
• New Space Suits
• Pad 39b & Escape System
• Moon & Mars missions
• Models

Project Constellation (back to contents)
from Wikipedia...

Project Constellation is a NASA program to create a new generation of spacecraft for human spaceflight, consisting primarily of the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles, the Orion crew capsule, the Earth Departure Stage and the Lunar Surface Access Module. These spacecraft will be capable of performing a variety of missions, from Space Station resupply to lunar landings.

Most of the Constellation hardware is based on systems originally developed for the Space Shuttle, although Orion's two-part crew and service module system is heavily influenced by the earlier Apollo Spacecraft. Proposed Constellation missions may employ both Earth Orbit Rendezvous and Lunar Orbit Rendezvous techniques.

On July 31, 2005, the Orlando Sun published the first story detailing NASA's thinking on Project Constellation. This is the earliest concept drawing that I have in my collection.
Discarded System Concepts
Boeing
These Boeing renderings are actually from the Orbital Space Plane project, which predated Project Constellation. Earth orbit, translunar and martian travel modes are shown below.

Right now, NASA is looking for private partners to fund the lunar portion of the program, and funding the Mars portion is considered politically impossible by most members of congress.
Delta IV launches humans
Credit: Boeing

Transluner configuration
Credit: Boeing

Mars transit configuration
Credit: Boeing

Orbital Space Plane rides a Delta IV into orbit
Credit: Boeing

Orbital Space Plane rides an SRB-based rocket into orbit
Credit: Boeing

Energia
Energia was the rocket that the Soviet Space Shuttle Buran was strapped to. The Energia Rocket was capable of lofting 100 tons into orbit. The Block A with four strap-on boosters was intended to be reusable, although reusablity doesn't necessarily save money! I don't think that NASA, who had a shuttle-industrial complex to feed, seriously considered this proposal. By the way, I found a video on Youtube showing the Energia launching the Polyus weapons platform in 1987. This thing is enormous, and it yaws wildly on lift-off!
Launch Concept
Credit: Russian Space Agency

Energia with Buran compared to the Space Shuttle
Credit: Russian Space Agency

NASA
NASA came to the conclusion early on that if Project Constellation used the existing Space Shuttle industrial complex, it would be a lot easier to sell it to congress. As the program advanced however, more and more of the shuttle dropped away. Plans to use the existing shuttle stack with a cargo carrier rather than a shuttle was discarded. Plans to use the Space Shuttle Main Engines were also discarded. The Solid Rocket Boosters do play a major roll as the first stage of the Ares I and in their traditional roll as strap-on boosters on the massive Ares V.
System concept
Credit: NASA

Shuttle heavy lift
Credit: NASA

Another system concept
Credit: NASA

Early comparison when Ares V was still a shuttle derived vehicle
Credit: NASA

Saturn + Shuttle = Constellation
Credit: NASA

Approved System Concept
The final concept ended up being a technologically up-to-date, heavier lifting version of the Apollo program. NASA had to undergo a wrenching process to backtrack from the winged spaceplane concept back to the capsule concept. Because of the limited thrust-to-weight ratio of chemical fuel, NASA was forced to build a very delicate spaceplane. Quite frankly, the capsule on top of a rocket is the safest way to go with chemical propulsion, and you have to credit NASA with admitting that.
Ares I launch vehicle with
Orion Spacecraft

Credit: NASA

Ares V launch vehicle with Lunar Surface Access Module
Credit: NASA

Ares V jettisons its aeroshell during ascent
Credit: NASA

Ares V (left) and Ares I comparison
Credit: NASA

Comparison of Saturn V, Shuttle, Ares I and Ares V
Credit: NASA

Orion and LSEM orbiting the Moon
Credit: NASA

Crew Exploration Vehicle (Orion) (back to contents)
The latest specifications for the Orion spacecraft are available at Astronautix.com, and they also have an excellent history of the CEV as well.

From wikipedia...

The Orion Crew & Service Module (CSM) stack consists of two main parts: a conical Crew Module (CM), and a cylindrical Service Module (SM) which will hold the spacecraft's propulsion system and expendable onboard supplies. Both are based heavily on the Apollo Command & Service Modules (Apollo CSM) flown between 1967 and 1975, but include advances derived from the Space Shuttle program. "Going with known technology and known solutions lowers the risk," according to Neil Woodward, director of the integration office in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate.
Discarded CEV Concepts
Boeing
The Soyuz used to have a second, habitable compartment for on-orbit use only (jettisoned before reentry), so Boeing took a shot at it, but NASA decided not to go this route.
Crew Exploration Vehicle
Credit: Boeing

Boeing / Northrop Grumman
Northrop Grumman partnered with Boeing in their unsuccessful attempt to win the Crew Exploration Vehicle contract. Note the dual engines on the rear of the Service Module.
CEV in Earth orbit
Credit: Northrop Grumman

Departing Earth Orbit
Credit: Northrop Grumman

CEV orbiting Moon
Credit: Northrop Grumman

CEV orbiting Moon
Credit: Northrop Grumman

Lockheed Martin
Lockheed really works hard. They put all the effort into this design, and then turned on a dime and won with their capsule design. This design reminds me of the new Russian Kliper intended to replace Soyuz if anyone would care to fund it, which they don't.
Crew Exploration Vehicle
Credit: Lockheed Martin

CEV configuration
Credit: Lockheed Martin

CEV Cross Section
Credit: Lockheed Martin

NASA
Here are a variety of Nasa non-shuttle concepts. On the left, ISS Emergency Return Vehicle (unrelated to Orion), a 1990's era image from the Space Exploration Initiative, and right a 2004'ish concept of Orion.
Emergency Return Vehicle
Credit: NASA

Capsule on the moon?
Credit: NASA

2004 CEV concept
Credit: NASA

United Space Alliance
United Space Alliance was formed by Lockheed and Rockwell in 1995 to handle the launching of the Space Shuttle. They would like to handle the launching of Ares rockets as well. These images appeared in November 2006 in their company magazine.
Seats 6 comfortably
Credit: United Space Alliance

Development Laboratory
Credit: United Space Alliance

Approved CEV Concept
NASA finally settled on an Apollo-like capsule, but much larger and capable of holding a larger crew. This capsule will be reusable, and its service module will sport solar panels.
Initial concept model of the Crew Exploration Vehicle
Credit: NASA

Enroute to the ISS
Credit: NASA

Orion parachuting down
Credit: NASA

Orion airbag landing
Credit: NASA

Comparing CEV to Apollo
Credit: nasaspaceflight.com

Comparison (left to right) CEV, Apollo, Big Gemini, TKS Soyuz Replacement, Soyuz and Shenzhou
Credit: Encyclopedia Astronautica

CEV diagram
Credit: NASA

Lockheed Designs the CEV
In September, 2006 Lockheed Martin beat out Boeing to design and build the Crew Excursion Vehicle, now known as the Orion Spacecraft. Note that the solar panels are now round, and more detail is emerging of the service module. Lockheed does a great job of releasing high res solid model images of their work, which I appreciate!
Lockheed Images pre-2007
These were generated by Lockheed to illustrate their plans should they win the bidding, and they did.
The Ares I launches Orion
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Orion approaches the ISS
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Orion in lunar orbit
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Orion with the Lunar Surface Access Module in tow.
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Reentry
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Images 2007
More great images of design revision 606.
Structural model
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Comparison of Orion design revisions 604, 605 and 606
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Launch Abort System detail
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Exploded view of design rev. 606
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Solid model view 1
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Solid model view 2
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Solid model view 3
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Solid model view 4
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Service Module
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Service Module Interior
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Cruising to the ISS 1
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Cruising to the ISS 2
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Cruising to the ISS 3
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Cruising to the ISS 4
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Images 2008
Lockheed numbered its designs starting at 600. There are two design revisions in play - 606 which uses airbags to land on the ground, and 607 which deletes the airbags for a water landing only.
Final decision on crew capacity
is four.

Credit: Lockheed Martin

CEV, Service Module and
rocket 2nd stage adapter.

Credit: Lockheed Martin

On orbit with circular solar
panels extended.

Credit: Lockheed Martin

Assembly including Launch
Abort System solid rocket.

Credit: Lockheed Martin

Enroute to the ISS.
Credit: Lockheed Martin

In Lunar Orbit.
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Andrews Space mockup
What's the first thing you do when starting a new spaceship design? Get out the jig saw and start cutting plywood! Andrews Space helped NASA with its concept planning and built this mockup, pictures of which I downloaded in October 2005. This is a model of the initial 5.4 meter diameter capsule; the current design was reduced to about 5 meters to save weight, which still gives 2.5 times the interior volume of Apollo. As of July, 2008, the CEV crew is reduced to four.
CEV Mockup 1
Credit: Andrews Space

CEV Mockup 2
Credit: Andrews Space

CEV Mockup 3
Credit: Andrews Space

CEV Mockup 4
Credit: Andrews Space

CEV Mockup 5
Credit: Andrews Space

CEV Mockup 6
Credit: Andrews Space

CEV Mockup 7
Credit: Andrews Space

CEV Mockup 8
Credit: Andrews Space

CEV Mockup 9
Credit: Andrews Space

Service Module Mockup
Somebody put some real effort into an a half-section Orion Service Module mockup at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH. These were taken in December, 2006 by one of the NASA volunteers who built it.
Orion Service Module
Credit: NASA

Orion Service Module
Credit: NASA

Orion Service Module
Credit: NASA

Launch Abort System Test
Boeing wasn't left out after Lockheed got the Orion contract. They just released these cool image sequences of their proposed Launch Abort System test. Boilerplate construction began in 2007 - see the picture sequence here.
Fire!
Credit: Boeing

Hauling the mail.
Credit: Boeing

LES Tower Eject
Credit: Boeing

Any landing you can walk away from is a good landing...
Credit: Boeing

Parachute sequence
Credit: NASA

2nd Stage & LAS Test
This is a test of the launch abort system at high speed and altitude. NASA has obtained an old Peacekeeper Missile to refurbish for this test. I am reminded of the Little Joe tests of the Apollo Launch Escape System.
Ready to launch
Credit: Boeing

Booster lifts Orion and the LAS
Credit: Boeing

Abort!
Credit: Boeing

Clear of the booster!
Credit: Boeing

LAS Tower Eject
Credit: Boeing

Drogue Chutes
Credit: Boeing

Main Chutes
Credit: Boeing

Floating Down
Credit: Boeing

Whoompf!
Credit: Boeing

The Ares Rocket Family (back to contents)
Ares V and Ares I
Credit: NASA

Ares I and Ares V
Credit: NASA

Ares family in flight
Credit: NASA

Ares I and Ares V Compared
June, 2008

Credit: NASA

The Ares I Integrated Vehicle
Astronautix.com has the latest specifications for the Ares I

From from wikipedia...

Ares I is the crew launch component of Project Constellation. Unlike with the Space Shuttle, where the crew and cargo were launched simultaneously on the same rocket, the plans for Project Constellation outline having two separate launch vehicles, the Ares I and the Ares V, for crew and cargo, respectively. Having two separate launch vehicles will allow for more specialized designs for the different purposes the rockets will fulfill. The Ares I rocket is specifically being designed to launch the Orion Crew Vehicle. Orion is intended as a crew capsule, similar in design to the Project Apollo capsule, to transport astronauts to the International Space Station, the Moon, and eventually Mars.
Ares I on the pad
Credit: NASA

Another pad view
Credit: NASA

Ares I in action
Credit: NASA

Ares I in action
Credit: NASA

Ares I Assembly
Credit: NASA

Ares I from 2007
Credit: NASA

The official version as of
September, 2009

Credit: Nasa Project Orion Office

The 1st Stage (ATK Launch Systems)
ATK, which currently builds the Space Shuttle's SRB's, will construct the Ares I first stage. Vibration from this stage reverberating through the rest of the rocket has become a major technical obstacle in the design of the Ares I rocket.
Ares I Cross Section
May, 2005

Credit: ATK Launch Systems

Here is a simulation of slowing down the first stage after separation. There is some donut shaped doohickus near the base that helps slow it down.
Credit: ATK Launch Systems

Ares I First Stage
June, 2008

Credit: ATK Launch Systems

The official version as of
September, 2009

Credit: Nasa Project Orion Office

The 2nd Stage (Boeing)
Staging from 1st to 2nd
Credit: Boeing

Boeing's upper stage
Credit: Boeing

Boeing's upper stage
Credit: Boeing

Boeing's upper stage
Credit: Boeing

Boeing's upper stage
Credit: Boeing

Boeing's upper stage
Credit: Boeing

Boeing's upper stage
Credit: Boeing

Boeing's upper stage
Credit: Boeing

Solid model of the upper stage boilerplate simulator for the Ares I-X test flight that took place in October, 2009
Credit: Boeing

The official version as of
June, 2008

Credit: NASA

The official version as of
September, 2009

Credit: Nasa Project Orion Office

The Instrument Ring
The instrument ring is located on top of the 2nd stage. It provides all control and guidance for the Ares I rocket during launch. The Ares I cross sectional mockup (right) was photographed at the Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH, during the summer of 2005
The Instrument Ring
circa 2007

Credit: NASA

Another view of the instrument ring
12/12/2007

Credit: NASA

Ares I cross section mockup
circa 2006

Credit: NASA

The Ares I-X Rocket
The Ares I-X is the version of the Ares I rocket they are building for the flight test in Fall, 2009. The first stage will have only 4 of the 5 segments loaded with solid rocket fuel, with the fifth acting as a dummy. The second stage and CEV will also be boilerplates. The flight of the Ares I-X will test the performance and control of the first stage, and demonstrate separation and recovery of the first stage. The second stage and CEV dummy's will then continue on in a ballistic trajectory to crash, uncontrolled, into the ocean.

Actual hardware photos are available on my hardware page.

Schematic of the Ares I-X
Credit: NASA

Flight plan for the Ares I-X
Credit: NASA

Mission profile from May, 2009
Credit: NASA

Artists concept from May, 2009
Credit: NASA

Artists concept from May, 2009
Credit: NASA

Ares I-X (right) compared with
Ares I (left), July, 2008

Credit: NASA

Ares I-X launch
Credit: NASA

Ares I-X on the pad
Credit: NASA

Artists concept from May, 2009
Credit: NASA

Artists concept from May, 2009
Credit: NASA

Artists concept from May, 2009
Credit: NASA

Fun Ares I-X Movie Poster from July 2008
Credit: NASA

Ares I-X late 2007 Image
Credit: NASA

The Ares V Rocket
Astronautix.com has the latest specifications for the Ares V

From wikipedia...

The Ares V is a cargo rocket designed to carry payloads, such as the Altair Lunar Lander and Earth Departure Stage into orbit to meet up with the CEV capsule launched separately by the Ares I rocket. In June, 2008, NASA increased the payload capacity of the Ares V from 70 to 78 tons, increased its length from 361 to 381 feet and added a sixth RS-68 engine to the first stage.
Ares V on the pad
Credit: NASA

Ares V staging
Credit: NASA

Enroute to orbit
Credit: NASA

Ares V staging
Credit: NASA

Ares V assembly
Credit: NASA

June, 2008 redesign. Note how the sides no longer flair inward towards the top of the rocket.
Credit: NASA

Ares V Large Space Telescope
Now that you've built the Ares V, what else can you use it for? In June, 2007, NASA proposed that a telescope with a mirror in the 6 to 8 meter range could be put into a Lagrange-2 orbit (a sort of balancing orbit between the earth and the moon). The Ares V can hoist 130,000 kG into orbit, 8% more than the Saturn V. You can see that the proposed telescope's mirror would be much larger than the 2.4 meter mirror on the Hubble.

One interesting feature is that the optics package would be located at the base of the unit so that it could be ejected and a remote spaceship could insert a new one.
Large Telescope vs. Hubble
Credit: NASA

Large Telescope cross section
Credit: NASA

Rocket Engines (back to contents)
Initially, NASA was going to use Space Shuttle Main Engines to power Ares rockets, but it was decided that there were less expensive alternatives, especially since the Ares rockets return to the days of discarding the engines after every launch, rather than reusing them like on the Space Shuttle.
J-2X
The J-2 rocket engine burns liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen, and was installed on the second stage of the Saturn V moon rocket (in a cluster of 5), and as the sole engine on the third stage, where it was restartable in space.The J-2X is a modern redesign for the second stage of the Ares I rocket. I have photos of the J2-X test bed on my hardware page. You can also check out wikipedia for details.

In August, 2007, a 1.2 billion dollar contract was let to Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne to develop and test the J2X.
J-2X Concept Image
Credit: Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

Another J-2X solid model view
Credit: Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

August, 2007, Concept
Credit: Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

A dynamic solid model view
Credit: Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

The official version as of
September, 2009

Credit: Nasa Project Orion Office

RS-68
The RS-68 is a liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen engine with a thrust level about 3 times that of the J-2X. It is planned to use six of these engines to power the first stage of the Ares V rocket. This venerable engine has been in service lofting Delta IV rockets since 2002. My hardware page has photos of the RS-68 firing, and you can also check out wikipedia.
RS-68 solid model
Credit: Boeing

The Earth Departure Stage (back to contents)
From wikipedia...

The Ares V Earth Departure Stage (EDS) is the high-energy cryogenic upper stage of NASA's proposed new Ares V launch vehicle. Its purpose is to provide propulsion for the Orion spacecraft as part of Project Constellation operations in Earth orbit, near-Earth space, and beyond. Unlike the S-IVB stage of the earlier Saturn V launcher, which had to propel the entire Apollo spacecraft (i.e. both the Apollo Command/Service Module and Lunar Module) into both a low Earth "parking" orbit and then again to the Moon, the EDS will boost only the Orion spacecraft's Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) into space; the Orion CSM stack will be launched separately atop an Ares I launch vehicle and will link up with the EDS/LSAM on orbit, a method known as Earth Orbit Rendezvous (EOR), a technique considered by NASA and Dr. Wernher von Braun for the Apollo program in the early stages of planning, but was dropped in favor of the lunar orbit rendezvous approach. Once all vehicle components are properly configured, the EDS will restart and propel the complete Orion spacecraft to Earth escape velocity for transits to lunar orbit and other destinations.
Translunar Injection (TLI)
Credit: NASA

Translunar Injection (TLI)
Credit: NASA

Translunar Injection (TLI)
Credit: NASA

The most recent Earth Departure Stage image
Credit: Boeing

The Altair Moon Lander (back to contents)
Astronautix.com has the latest specifications for the LSAM

From wikipedia...

The Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) will be the main transport vehicle for lunar-bound astronauts. Like its Apollo Lunar Module (LM) predecessor, the LSAM consists of two parts: an ascent stage which houses the four-person crew, and a descent stage which has the landing legs, the majority of the crew's consumables (oxygen and water), and scientific equipment. Unlike the Apollo LM, the LSAM is to touch down in the lunar polar regions favored by NASA for future lunar base construction. The LSAM, like its Apollo predecessor, is not reusable and is discarded after use.
2006 NASA Proposal
Its a bigger version of the 1960's era Lunar Lander. Boy, those astronauts sure are perched up high when they get out of the ascent module...
A fine afternoon on the moon
Credit: NASA

Leaving the moon
Credit: NASA

Lunar Surface Access Module
Credit: NASA

2007 Lockheed Martin Proposal
Lockheed Martin has this thoughtful proposal on how to design a better lunar lander. We all know that in 2006 NASA was primarily focused on the Orion Spacecraft, and has yet to put a lot of thought into the LSAM. I feel that we can do much better than the 2006 proposal...
Concept 1: Dual Thrust Axis Lander (DTAL)
Credit: Lockheed Martin

DTAL on lunar surface with gimbaled solar arrays
Credit: Lockheed Martin

DTAL Landing Sequence
Credit: Lockheed Martin

DTAL Ascent Module
Credit: Lockheed Martin

DTAL Ascent Module, rear
Credit: Lockheed Martin

DTAL Ascent Module with inflatable airlock
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Concept 2: Retro Propulsion Lander (RPL)
Credit: Lockheed Martin

RPL on lunar surface
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Concept 3: Single Stage Lander (SSL)
Credit: Lockheed Martin

SSL cutaway view
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Monocoque tank concept
Credit: Lockheed Martin

Enhanced cryo storage concept
Credit: Lockheed Martin

NASA names it Altair; December, 2007
NASA's thinking on the physical configuration of the lunar lander continues to evolve.
Altair Enroute to the moon
Credit: NASA

Altair Enroute to the moon
Credit: NASA

This ain't Neil's '69 Grumman.
Credit: NASA

Near Earth Asteroid Mission (back to contents)
In August, 2007, Digital Space, a contractor for NASA, came up with a mission to use the Orion Spacecraft to land humans on a near Earth asteroid. This is an interesting concept. The gravity on an asteroid would be quite low - would the astronauts have to be tethered? It would be less like a landing and more like a docking!
Approaching an Asteroid
Credit: Digital Space

Landing
Credit: Digital Space

EVA
Credit: Digital Space

New Space Suits (back to contents)
NASA is working on new space suits for the Project Constellation astronauts. The current shuttle EVA suits weigh 300 pounds and are not designed for use on low gravity bodies, such as the moon. The Apollo suits were very rigid and hard to work in. The new suits should solve both these problems.
Proposed new space suit, July, 2008.
Credit: NASA

Proposed new space suit, July, 2008.
Credit: NASA

Pad 39b & Escape System (back to contents)
Here is a cool new feature of the Ares I launch pad - a roller coaster style "Emergency Egress System". If the crew needs to leave the launch pad in a hurry, they will hop into the coaster cars and zoom straight down the 380 foot high tower, leveling out and using their high speed to roll away from the pad to the bunkers.
Roller coaster style crew evacuation system.
Credit: NASA

Another view of Launch Pad 39b.
Credit: NASA

Moon & Mars missions (back to contents)
These inspiring images show astronauts living and working on the Moon and Mars. I archived these from NASA in August, 2006 but I think they are a couple years older.
On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On the moon
Credit: NASA

On Mars
Credit: NASA

On Mars
Credit: NASA

On Mars
Credit: NASA

On Mars
Credit: NASA

Models (back to contents)
The kit modeling industry is hot on the heels of NASA as development of Project Constellation continues.
Lockheed Martin's 2006 Version
Credit: Moon Pans

Ares I Rocket
Credit: Real Space Models

NASA's 2005 Concept
Credit: Masterpiece Models

NASA's 2005 Concept
Credit: Masterpiece Models

NASA's 2005 Concept
Credit: Masterpiece Models

NASA's 2005 Concept
Credit: Fantastic Plastic

Latest 2007 Orion 606 Design
Credit: Fantastic Plastic

Early Boeing CEV concept atop Delta IV Rocket
Credit: Real Space Models

1:144 Ares I and Ares V
(only $1,695.00)

Credit: The Space Store


Links (back)
Space Blogs
News From Space
Books
Pocket Guide to Project Orion
Contractors
Aerojet (small thrusters)
Andrews Space (think tank)
ATK Launch System (Ares I 1st stage & Ares V SRB's)
Boeing - Project Constellation page
Lockheed Martin - Orion Crew Vehicle
Orbital Space Sciences
Pratt & Whitney (J-1X & RS-68 rocket engines)
RS&H (Orion emergency egress system)
United Space Alliance (launch ground crew)
Encyclopedia Articles
Encyclopedia Astronautica - Ares I
Encyclopedia Astronautica - Ares V
Encyclopedia Astronautica - Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM)
Encyclopedia Astronautica - Orion
GlobalSecurity.org
Wikipedia
NASA - official
NASA Headquarters Library, Project Constellation
NASA Official Project Constellation Site
NASA Official Orion Site
NASA Official Ares Rocket Site
NASA Official Project Constellation Movie
NASA - unoffical
NasaSpaceFlight.com - not official, but lots of great info.
NasaWatch.com - where NASA employees can tell the truth anonymously
Spaceflight Simulator
Orbiter - A Free Spaceflight Simulator
Other
SpaceAnimation.com Excellent LSAM Images
SpaceFlightWeb.com Project Constellation
SpaceStore.com - buy Project Constellation stuff!



The purpose of this web site is to archive images of Project Constellation as they appear on the web. Often these images may be displayed for only a few months. I collect them, then update this page every 3-6 months. I hope you enjoy it!